forum Politics and Society ›› Half of world's animals gone since 1970 ›› new reply Post Reply
crunkmoose
Fuck Nazis.
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November 30 2015 9:21 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: WREN

Humans are a disgusting, destructive species.



Seconded. A virus with shoes.
Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
1,170 Posts
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December 1 2015 1:33 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
Chris_High
Chooch
2,359 Posts
31/M/FL


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December 1 2015 2:13 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
Is the guy dancing in that pic
crunkmoose
Fuck Nazis.
24,526 Posts
62/M/MA


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December 1 2015 10:16 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: Chris_High

Is the guy dancing in that pic



Whale dance! Whale dance!

Also, yeah.. there is ZERO reason to hunt whales at all.
Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
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December 9 2015 3:16 AM   QuickQuote Quote  


400 percent spike in whales entangled in nets along California coast

AP December 9 2015

LONG BEACH, Calif. — An unusual warming in the Pacific Ocean may be having disastrous consequences for the majestic whales that use the waters off California as a migratory super-highway.

This year alone, more than 60 whales entangled in fishing gear have been spotted along the coast — a more than 400 percent spike over normal and a pattern that began in 2014. Scientists believe the whales may be following prey closer to shore as warm water influences feeding patterns, putting them on a collision course with fishermen, crabbers and lobstermen.

The situation is so dire that the crab fishery has begun working closely with state and federal agencies and environmental groups to figure out where and how the whales are running into their gear. The ocean mammals also have become entangled in gill nets and lobster gear, but authorities have identified the crab fishery as the most urgent concern.

“This time of year, the whales would be offshore but with the blob of warm water, they’re right off the beach. They’re right where the crabs are,” said Jim Anderson, a crabber who’s helping to mobilize the state’s 562 licensed Dungeness crab fishermen. “You go talk to a guy who’s been fishing for 40 or 50 years and he’s never seen anything like it.”

Whales that have rope stuck in their mouths or wrapped tightly around their fins or tail will eventually die if they can’t free themselves. Highly trained volunteer rescue teams are only able to disentangle a small percentage despite tracking devices that allow them to follow the hobbled animals for miles. Many swim away and their fate is never known.

A humpback whale that was partially freed recently off La Jolla, California had line stuck in its mouth, a huge knot of rope six feet behind its tail and 200 additional feet of rope and buoys dragging behind it. Another rescued nearby had a 70-foot line looped over its tail that was connected to a lobster pot still swinging from the rope’s end underwater.



Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
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December 15 2015 5:10 PM   QuickQuote Quote  




Sea lion deaths linked to severe brain damage caused by toxic algae bloom


Record numbers of sea lions have stranded in each of the past three years, according to the Marine Mammal Center. There are likely a number of factors, but Cook says domoic acid probably increases those strandings both directly, through damaging the animals’ navigation abilities, and indirectly, through pups being abandoned by mothers.

The findings provide critical new information about the impacts of domoic acid, which has increasingly devastated wildlife – and fishermen – in recent years. The toxin is the reason why the season for Dungeness crab, a well-known and lucrative fishery along the west coast, has been delayed this year and has increasingly become one of the main impacts of warmer waters along the west coast as domoic acid-producing algal blooms grow larger and longer-lasting.

Those impacts have grown rapidly and recently. In 1998, hundreds of sea lions experiencing seizures stranded off Monterey Bay, 75 miles south of San Francisco. At first, the reason for the seizures was a mystery. “People thought it was mercury poisoning,” said Kathi Lefebvre, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientist who was not involved in the new research. She happened to be looking at the effects of domoic acid in fish in 1998 and thought the toxin might be the cause for sea lion seizures. It turned out to be the first documented case of domoic acid poisoning in marine life. Those cases have grown since, and this year could be the worst ever. “Every year since – for the last 17 years – there have been sick and dying sea lions, sometimes in the hundreds,” Lefebvre said.

This year was the first in which a sea lion affected by domoic acid poisoning was reported north of California, she said. “What we’re most concerned about right now is this year we have had the likely largest ever recorded algal bloom producing domoic acid on the US west coast, spanning the largest geographic range.”

Historically, the toxic algal bloom would last just a few weeks, but due to warmer waters from climate change this year’s bloom lasted for months. She said that persistence and its northward expansion makes studying the “sub-lethal chronic effects” domoic acid has on animals particularly important.


click here for link.



Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
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December 15 2015 5:42 PM   QuickQuote Quote  





Scientists Offer Solution to Kazakhstan Saiga Deaths Puzzle




“It started with just a few and then gradually gathered pace over two or three days,” Kock explains. “The best description is that they were dying like flies. Eventually the landscape was completely littered with these animals…From moving and eating normally to death was just a matter of hours. So it was hopeless. We wouldn't have had a chance of doing much to help individuals.”

“The cause of death of the saigas is hemorrhagic septicemia,” Steffen Zuther, a German researcher and the international coordinator of the Astana-based Altyn Dala Conservation Initiative, told the TV channel. Hemorrhagic septicemia — which scientists believe was rapidly spread across the steppe by ticks in May — is a form of pasteurellosis, a disease that killed nearly 12,000 saigas in a 2010 epidemic.

According to Professor Richard Kock from the University of London, a latent bacteria already present in the antelope’s system is the most likely factor in their mass death. The pasteurella resides in the throat of the antelope and is general harmless. However, an unknown factor may have acted as a catalyst for the bacteria to turn malevolent and cause the deaths of the unfortunate animals within weeks of each other.

Professor Kock believes this is most likely due to an environmental factor. The temperatures in Kazakhstan plummeted from 30°C to a frosty -5°C in the days leading up to the deaths.

In addition to the hike in temperatures, the knock-on effect on soil and vegetation in the area could have triggered the pasteurella bacteria into action. Some evidence suggests these opportunistic bacteria can be temperature sensitive. If the temperature suddenly rises in the environment where the bacteria live, they can suddenly switch to virulence.

The saiga is a very unusual, ancient animal that predates the wooly mammoth. It is highly adapted to the extreme environment of the Central Asian steppe, where temperatures can range from 49 degrees below zero to 113 degrees. They migrate over huge distances. They are also one of the fastest hoofed animals on earth, capable of reaching speeds of up to 70 miles per hour.

As recently as 2014, the entire saiga population was about 300,000. The central group of about 250,000 is the key population, Kock says. When the die-off began, Kock and his colleagues monitored two additional population sites, one of about 60,000, another of 8,000. Gradually it became clear, however, that there were about 15 different die-off sites.

After the event, the Kazak government agreed to do a census to try to establish the mortality rate. They found that, at most, only 30,000 out of the 250,000 central population survived, Kock says.




Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
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January 3 2016 8:26 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
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January 20 2016 9:18 AM   QuickQuote Quote  



Unwanted bycatch is often dumped back into the ocean and not counted in official figures




Global Fish Catch Drastically Underreported


The world's oceans have been overfished far more than reported, according to a new study.

The report, published in the journal Nature Communications, reanalyzed worldwide catch data and compared it to information that the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations uses. Researchers found that from 1950 to 2010, up to 30 percent more fish -- more than 35 billion tons a year -- were caught than reported to the agency.

Much of this unreported seafood stems from small-scale fisherman, illegal operations and millions of tons of bycatch, or fish accidentally caught and then discarded.

"You have a situation where we have long ceased to live off the interest," said Daniel Pauly, a professor at the University of British Columbia. "We now live off the capital."

Last year, a World Wildlife Fund study found many of the planet's fish populations were on the "brink of collapse," pointing to stocks of tuna and other fish that have declined by more than half since just 1970.
Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
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February 9 2016 12:24 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
1,170 Posts
35/M/NY


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February 18 2016 10:05 PM   QuickQuote Quote  











Endangered Baby Dolphin Dies After Swimmers Pass It Around For Selfies

World | Peter Holley, The Washington Post

An endangered baby dolphin was killed on a beach in Argentina last week after the animal was plucked from the water and passed around by beachgoers for petting and photos.

The incident, which took place at the beach resort town of Santa Teresita, has drawn wide condemnation from animal lovers and activists, including the Argentine Wildlife Foundation (AWF), which released a statement urging people to return dolphins encountered near the shore to ocean waters.

La Plata dolphins - also known as Franciscana dolphins - are only found in Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil, and fewer than 30,000 of them remain in the wild, the foundation said. The only type of river dolphin to inhabit saltwater, Franciscana dolphins are categorized as "vulnerable" on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species.

"The potential for recovery of this species is very low," the AWF said. "The Franciscan, like other dolphins, can not long remain above water. It has a very thick and greasy skin that provides warmth, so the weather will quickly cause dehydration and death."

NOAA describes La Plata dolphins as "extremely shy and evasive by nature" and notes that what little is known about them is "surrounded by superstition."

The IUNC notes that the main threats to the dolphins are gill nets, which are known to drown, injure or attach to marine mammals, causing extreme fatigue, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. But as it turns out, curious swimmers and other beachgoers are also a serious threat.

Video footage of last week's incident shows the animal being scooped up by a man and quickly surrounded by a curious mob eager to touch the animal.

The miniature dolphin, no more than a few feet long, is eventually left to die in the mud, where it can be seen lying motionless. At no point in the footage does it appear that anyone in the crowd intervened or attempted to return the animal to the water.



Bashar al-Asad
In sha'Allah
38,210 Posts
47/M/PA


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February 19 2016 12:27 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
what a bunch of retarded pieces of shit
crunkmoose
Fuck Nazis.
24,526 Posts
62/M/MA


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February 26 2016 11:13 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
fuck humans.
Bashar al-Asad
In sha'Allah
38,210 Posts
47/M/PA


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February 26 2016 12:04 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
half of the worlds straights have turned into gays
WREN
Pulp Free
52,194 Posts
37/M/PA


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February 26 2016 12:06 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
This is seriously the most depressing thread.
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