all threads All Threads ›› what is in the great pacific ocean garbage patch? ›› new reply Post Reply
Kev_in
One falls off
4,308 Posts
38/M/PA


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August 21 2011 10:26 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
This world's a fucking nightmare blackened skies, deforestation, poisoned seas
brenoritvrezorkre
tortiteniphates
26,685 Posts
31/M/CA


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August 21 2011 10:35 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: InTheButtLikeWhat

i hate plastic. i avoid buying it as much as possible.


same.
Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
1,170 Posts
34/M/NY


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January 20 2015 12:44 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
Ocean life faces mass extinction, broad study says

Carl Zimmer
Friday, 16 Jan 2015 The New York Times


A team of scientists, in a groundbreaking analysis of data from hundreds of sources, has concluded that humans are on the verge of causing unprecedented damage to the oceans and the animals living in them.

"We may be sitting on a precipice of a major extinction event," said Douglas J. McCauley, an ecologist at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and an author of the new research, which was published on Thursday in the journal Science.

Dr. Pinsky, Dr. McCauley and their colleagues sought a clearer picture of the oceans' health by pulling together data from an enormous range of sources, from discoveries in the fossil record to statistics on modern container shipping, fish catches and seabed mining. While many of the findings already existed, they had never been juxtaposed in such a way.

A number of experts said the result was a remarkable synthesis, along with a nuanced and encouraging prognosis.

There are clear signs already that humans are harming the oceans to a remarkable degree, the scientists found. Some ocean species are certainly overharvested, but even greater damage results from large-scale habitat loss, which is likely to accelerate as technology advances the human footprint, the scientists reported.

Coral reefs, for example, have declined by 40 percent worldwide, partly as a result of climate-change-driven warming.

Some fish are migrating to cooler waters already. Black sea bass, once most common off the coast of Virginia, have moved up to New Jersey. Less fortunate species may not be able to find new ranges. At the same time, carbon emissions are altering the chemistry of seawater, making it more acidic.

"If you cranked up the aquarium heater and dumped some acid in the water, your fish would not be very happy," Dr. Pinsky said. "In effect, that's what we're doing to the oceans."

Fragile ecosystems like mangroves are being replaced by fish farms, which are projected to provide most of the fish we consume within 20 years. Bottom trawlers scraping large nets across the sea floor have already affected 20 million square miles of ocean, turning parts of the continental shelf to rubble. Whales may no longer be widely hunted, the analysis noted, but they are now colliding more often as the number of container ships rises.

Mining operations, too, are poised to transform the ocean. Contracts for seabed mining now cover 460,000 square miles underwater, the researchers found, up from zero in 2000. Seabed mining has the potential to tear up unique ecosystems and introduce pollution into the deep sea.

The oceans are so vast that their ecosystems may seem impervious to change. But Dr. McClenachan warned that the fossil record shows that global disasters have wrecked the seas before. "Marine species are not immune to extinction on a large scale," she said.

Until now, the seas largely have been spared the carnage visited on terrestrial species, the new analysis also found.

The fossil record indicates that a number of large animal species became extinct as humans arrived on continents and islands. For example, the moa, a giant bird that once lived on New Zealand, was wiped out by arriving Polynesians in the 1300s, probably within a century.

But it was only after 1800, with the Industrial Revolution, that extinctions on land really accelerated.

Humans began to alter the habitat that wildlife depended on, wiping out forests for timber, plowing under prairie for farmland, and laying down roads and railroads across continents.

Species began going extinct at a much faster pace. Over the past five centuries, researchers have recorded 514 animal extinctions on land. But the authors of the new study found that documented extinctions are far rarer in the ocean.

Before 1500, a few species of seabirds are known to have vanished. Since then, scientists have documented only 15 ocean extinctions, including animals such as the Caribbean monk seal and the Steller's sea cow.

While these figures are likely underestimates, Dr. McCauley said that the difference was nonetheless revealing.

"Fundamentally, we're a terrestrial predator," he said. "It's hard for an ape to drive something in the ocean extinct."
Bashar al-Asad
In sha'Allah
38,210 Posts
46/M/PA


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January 20 2015 10:53 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: brian.

when they get t-boned that baby is probably flying all the way into the ocean trash vortex

lol
Brett Weir
im gay
45,323 Posts
34/M/NY


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October 28 2015 8:16 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
Schnell's bike is there
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