forum Politics and Society ›› 'Ten years' to solve nature crisis, UN hearings.. ›› new reply Post Reply
jdubit

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October 19 2010 3:25 AM   QuickQuote Quote  

'Ten years' to solve nature crisis, UN meeting hears

The UN biodiversity convention meeting has opened with warnings that the ongoing loss of nature is hurting human societies as well as the natural world.

The two-week gathering aims to set new targets for conserving life on Earth.

Japan's Environment Minister Ryo Matsumoto said biodiversity loss would become irreversible unless curbed soon.

Much hope is being pinned on economic analyses showing the loss of species and ecosystems is costing the global economy trillions of dollars each year.

Ahmed Djoghlaf, executive secretary of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), described the meeting in Nagoya, Japan, as a "defining moment" in the history of mankind.
Continue reading the main story
Biodiversity: The threat to nature

* The cost of damaging Planet Earth
* A new washing powder?
* Richard's Black's analysis
* The value of Kenya's largest forest

"[Buddhist scholar] Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki said 'the problem of nature is the problem of human life'. Today, unfortunately, human life is a problem for nature," he told delegates in his opening speech.

Referring to the target set at the UN World Summit in 2002, he said:

"Let's have the courage to look in the eyes of our children and admit that we have failed, individually and collectively, to fulfil the Johannesburg promise made by 110 heads of state to substantially reduce the rate of loss of biodiversity by 2010.

"Let us look in the eyes of our children and admit that we continue to lose biodiversity at an unprecedented rate, thus mortgaging their future."

Earlier this year, the UN published a major assessment - the Global Biodiversity Outlook - indicating that virtually all trends spanning the state of the natural world were heading downwards, despite conservation successes in some regions.
Continue reading the main story
“Start Quote

We are about to reach a threshold beyond which biodiversity loss will become irreversible”

End Quote Ryo Matsumoto Japanese environment minister

It showed that loss and degradation of forests, coral reefs, rivers and other elements of the natural world was having an impact on living standards in some parts of the world - an obvious example being the extent to which loss of coral affects fish stocks.

In his opening speech, Mr Matsumoto suggested impacts could be much broader in future.

"All life on Earth exists thanks to the benefits from biodiversity in the forms of fertile soil, clear water and clean air," he said.

"We are now close to a 'tipping point' - that is, we are about to reach a threshold beyond which biodiversity loss will become irreversible, and may cross that threshold in the next 10 years if we do not make proactive efforts for conserving biodiversity."
Climate clouds

In recent years, climate change has dominated the agenda of environmental politics.

And Achim Steiner, executive director of the UN Environment Programme, suggested there is a lack of understanding at political levels of why tackling biodiversity is just important.
Newly discovered katydid in Papua New Guinea (6 September 2009) 2010 is the International Year of Biodiversity

"This is the only planet in this Universe that is known to have this kind of life," he said.

"This fact alone should give us food for thought, But more importantly, we are destroying the very foundations that sustain life on this planet; and yet when we meet in these intergovernmental fora, society somehow struggles to understand and appreciate what it is what we're trying to do here, and why it matters."

On the table in Nagoya is a comprehensive draft agreement that would tackle the underlying causes of biodiversity loss, as well as setting new targets for conservation.

At the heart of the
jdubit
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October 19 2010 3:50 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
don't worry everybody. watch the latest dexter, and listen to your madball or wisdom in chains and everything will be cool.
aboutleaving
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October 19 2010 6:08 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
your comment on all of these threads is the same. why not have the quote and then links to all these articles in on thread?

request deletion.
crunkmoose
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October 19 2010 11:20 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: jdubit

don't worry everybody. watch the latest dexter, and listen to your madball or wisdom in chains and everything will be cool.



Don't worry everybody. Watch the latest Left Behind movie and read your Bible and everything will be cool.




Sarcastic Existence
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October 19 2010 11:23 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: jdubit


'Ten years' to solve nature crisis, UN meeting hears

The UN biodiversity convention meeting has opened with warnings that the ongoing loss of nature is hurting human societies as well as the natural world.

The two-week gathering aims to set new targets for conserving life on Earth.

Japan's Environment Minister Ryo Matsumoto said biodiversity loss would become irreversible unless curbed soon.

Much hope is being pinned on economic analyses showing the loss of species and ecosystems is costing the global economy trillions of dollars each year.

Ahmed Djoghlaf, executive secretary of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), described the meeting in Nagoya, Japan, as a "defining moment" in the history of mankind.
Continue reading the main story
Biodiversity: The threat to nature

* The cost of damaging Planet Earth
* A new washing powder?
* Richard's Black's analysis
* The value of Kenya's largest forest

"[Buddhist scholar] Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki said 'the problem of nature is the problem of human life'. Today, unfortunately, human life is a problem for nature," he told delegates in his opening speech.

Referring to the target set at the UN World Summit in 2002, he said:

"Let's have the courage to look in the eyes of our children and admit that we have failed, individually and collectively, to fulfil the Johannesburg promise made by 110 heads of state to substantially reduce the rate of loss of biodiversity by 2010.

"Let us look in the eyes of our children and admit that we continue to lose biodiversity at an unprecedented rate, thus mortgaging their future."

Earlier this year, the UN published a major assessment - the Global Biodiversity Outlook - indicating that virtually all trends spanning the state of the natural world were heading downwards, despite conservation successes in some regions.
Continue reading the main story
"Start Quote

We are about to reach a threshold beyond which biodiversity loss will become irreversible"

End Quote Ryo Matsumoto Japanese environment minister

It showed that loss and degradation of forests, coral reefs, rivers and other elements of the natural world was having an impact on living standards in some parts of the world - an obvious example being the extent to which loss of coral affects fish stocks.

In his opening speech, Mr Matsumoto suggested impacts could be much broader in future.

"All life on Earth exists thanks to the benefits from biodiversity in the forms of fertile soil, clear water and clean air," he said.

"We are now close to a 'tipping point' - that is, we are about to reach a threshold beyond which biodiversity loss will become irreversible, and may cross that threshold in the next 10 years if we do not make proactive efforts for conserving biodiversity."
Climate clouds

In recent years, climate change has dominated the agenda of environmental politics.

And Achim Steiner, executive director of the UN Environment Programme, suggested there is a lack of understanding at political levels of why tackling biodiversity is just important.
Newly discovered katydid in Papua New Guinea (6 September 2009) 2010 is the International Year of Biodiversity

"This is the only planet in this Universe that is known to have this kind of life," he said.

"This fact alone should give us food for thought, But more importantly, we are destroying the very foundations that sustain life on this planet; and yet when we meet in these intergovernmental fora, society somehow struggles to understand and appreciate what it is what we're trying to do here, and why it matters."

On the table in Nagoya is a comprehensive draft agreement that would tackle the underlying causes of biodiversity loss, as well as setting new targets for conservation.

At the heart of the idea is the belief that if governments understand the financial costs of losing nature, they can adopt new economic models that reward conservation and penalise degradation.

A UN-sponsored project called The Economics of Ecosytems and Biodiversity (TEEB) calculates the cost at $2-5 trillion per year, predominantly in poorer parts of the world.

Jane Smart, head of the species programme at the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), said that although the problem was huge and complex, there were some encouraging signs.

"The good news is that when we carry out conservation, it does work; we increasingly know what to do, and when we do it, it works really really well," she told BBC News.

"So we need to do a lot more conservation work, such as protected areas - particularly in the sea, in the marine realm - we need to save vast areas of ocean to protect fish stocks - not to stop eating fish, but to eat fish in a sustainable way."
Triple win

Governments first agreed back in 1992, at the Rio Earth Summit that the ongoing loss of biodiversity needed attention. The CBD was born there, alongside the UN climate convention.

It aims to preserve the diversity of life on Earth, facilitate the sustainable use of plants and animals, and allow fair and equitable exploitation of natural genetic resources.

The UN hopes that a protocol on the final element - known as access and benefit sharing (ABS) - can be secured here, 18 years after it was agreed in principle.

However, the bitter politicking that has soured the atmosphere in a number of UN environment processes - most notably at the Copenhagen climate summit - looms over the Nagoya meeting.

Some developing nations are insisting that the ABS protocol be signed off before they will agree to the establishment of an international scientific panel to assess biodiversity issues.

The Intergovernental science-policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) is due to be signed off during the current UN General Assembly session in New York.

Many experts - and Western governments - believe it is necessary if scientific evidence on the importance of biodiversity loss is to be transmitted effectively to policymakers.


click here for link



Jeremiah 10:23: "I well know, O Jehovah, that to earthling man his way does not belong. It does not belong to man who is walking even to direct his step."








Originally posted by: jdubit

don't worry everybody. watch the latest dexter, and listen to your madball or wisdom in chains and everything will be cool.




ScrewFlanders
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October 19 2010 11:25 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
im going to go eat a condor egg omlette
jdubit
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October 19 2010 8:08 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: ScrewFlanders

im going to go eat a condor egg omlette



edgy brahhhh
LEATHERFACE
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October 19 2010 8:13 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: jdubit

Originally posted by: ScrewFlanders

im going to go eat a condor egg omlette



edgy brahhhh



Hell, I'm bringing bacon made from REAL illegal immigrants
jdubit
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October 19 2010 11:03 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: Sarcastic Existence

Originally posted by: jdubit


'Ten years' to solve nature crisis, UN meeting hears

The UN biodiversity convention meeting has opened with warnings that the ongoing loss of nature is hurting human societies as well as the natural world.

The two-week gathering aims to set new targets for conserving life on Earth.

Japan's Environment Minister Ryo Matsumoto said biodiversity loss would become irreversible unless curbed soon.

Much hope is being pinned on economic analyses showing the loss of species and ecosystems is costing the global economy trillions of dollars each year.

Ahmed Djoghlaf, executive secretary of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), described the meeting in Nagoya, Japan, as a "defining moment" in the history of mankind.
Continue reading the main story
Biodiversity: The threat to nature

* The cost of damaging Planet Earth
* A new washing powder?
* Richard's Black's analysis
* The value of Kenya's largest forest

"[Buddhist scholar] Daisetsu Teitaro Suzuki said 'the problem of nature is the problem of human life'. Today, unfortunately, human life is a problem for nature," he told delegates in his opening speech.

Referring to the target set at the UN World Summit in 2002, he said:

"Let's have the courage to look in the eyes of our children and admit that we have failed, individually and collectively, to fulfil the Johannesburg promise made by 110 heads of state to substantially reduce the rate of loss of biodiversity by 2010.

"Let us look in the eyes of our children and admit that we continue to lose biodiversity at an unprecedented rate, thus mortgaging their future."

Earlier this year, the UN published a major assessment - the Global Biodiversity Outlook - indicating that virtually all trends spanning the state of the natural world were heading downwards, despite conservation successes in some regions.
Continue reading the main story
"Start Quote

We are about to reach a threshold beyond which biodiversity loss will become irreversible"

End Quote Ryo Matsumoto Japanese environment minister

It showed that loss and degradation of forests, coral reefs, rivers and other elements of the natural world was having an impact on living standards in some parts of the world - an obvious example being the extent to which loss of coral affects fish stocks.

In his opening speech, Mr Matsumoto suggested impacts could be much broader in future.

"All life on Earth exists thanks to the benefits from biodiversity in the forms of fertile soil, clear water and clean air," he said.

"We are now close to a 'tipping point' - that is, we are about to reach a threshold beyond which biodiversity loss will become irreversible, and may cross that threshold in the next 10 years if we do not make proactive efforts for conserving biodiversity."
Climate clouds

In recent years, climate change has dominated the agenda of environmental politics.

And Achim Steiner, executive director of the UN Environment Programme, suggested there is a lack of understanding at political levels of why tackling biodiversity is just important.
Newly discovered katydid in Papua New Guinea (6 September 2009) 2010 is the International Year of Biodiversity

"This is the only planet in this Universe that is known to have this kind of life," he said.

"This fact alone should give us food for thought, But more importantly, we are destroying the very foundations that sustain life on this planet; and yet when we meet in these intergovernmental fora, society somehow struggles to understand and appreciate what it is what we're trying to do here, and why it matters."

On the table in Nagoya is a comprehensive draft agreement that would tackle the underlying causes of biodiversity loss, as well as setting new targets for conservation.

At the heart of the idea is the belief that if governments understand the financial costs of losing nature, they can adopt new economic models that reward conservation and penalise degradation.

A UN-sponsored project called The Economics of Ecosytems and Biodiversity (TEEB) calculates the cost at $2-5 trillion per year, predominantly in poorer parts of the world.

Jane Smart, head of the species programme at the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), said that although the problem was huge and complex, there were some encouraging signs.

"The good news is that when we carry out conservation, it does work; we increasingly know what to do, and when we do it, it works really really well," she told BBC News.

"So we need to do a lot more conservation work, such as protected areas - particularly in the sea, in the marine realm - we need to save vast areas of ocean to protect fish stocks - not to stop eating fish, but to eat fish in a sustainable way."
Triple win

Governments first agreed back in 1992, at the Rio Earth Summit that the ongoing loss of biodiversity needed attention. The CBD was born there, alongside the UN climate convention.

It aims to preserve the diversity of life on Earth, facilitate the sustainable use of plants and animals, and allow fair and equitable exploitation of natural genetic resources.

The UN hopes that a protocol on the final element - known as access and benefit sharing (ABS) - can be secured here, 18 years after it was agreed in principle.

However, the bitter politicking that has soured the atmosphere in a number of UN environment processes - most notably at the Copenhagen climate summit - looms over the Nagoya meeting.

Some developing nations are insisting that the ABS protocol be signed off before they will agree to the establishment of an international scientific panel to assess biodiversity issues.

The Intergovernental science-policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) is due to be signed off during the current UN General Assembly session in New York.

Many experts - and Western governments - believe it is necessary if scientific evidence on the importance of biodiversity loss is to be transmitted effectively to policymakers.


click here for link



Jeremiah 10:23: "I well know, O Jehovah, that to earthling man his way does not belong. It does not belong to man who is walking even to direct his step."








Originally posted by: jdubit

don't worry everybody. watch the latest dexter, and listen to your madball or wisdom in chains and everything will be cool.







yep, don't forget your booze either. drink up and all our problems will just vanish!
aboutleaving
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October 20 2010 2:05 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
or better yet pretend god exists
InTheButtLikeWhat
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October 20 2010 2:56 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
jdub- what, exactly, are YOU doing about it?
crunkmoose
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October 20 2010 3:20 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: InTheButtLikeWhat

jdub- what, exactly, are YOU doing about it?


He is waiting on jeebus to come back and make everything perfect.
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October 20 2010 6:46 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Wait, don't Jehovah's Witnesses totally mistrust the United Nations?
jdubit
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October 21 2010 5:49 AM   QuickQuote Quote  

"In The Face Of This Truth"

By Robert Jensen

20 September, 2010
Yes! Magazine

It's time to talk honestly about collapse-no matter how others may respond.

We live in the midst of multiple crises-economic and political, cultural and ecological-posing a significant threat to human existence at the level we have become accustomed to. There's no way to be awake to the depth of these crises without emotional reactions, no way to be aware of the pain caused by these systemic failures without some dread and distress.

Those emotions come from recognizing that we humans with our big brains have disrupted the balance of the living world in disastrous ways that may be causing irreversible ecological destruction, and that drastically different ways of living are not only necessary but inevitable, with no guarantee of a smooth transition.

This talk, in polite company, leads to being labeled hysterical, Chicken Little, apocalyptic. No matter that you are calm, aren't predicting the sky falling, and have made no reference to rapture. Pointing out that we live in unsustainable systems, that unsustainable systems can't be sustained, and that no person or institution with power in the dominant culture is talking about this-well, that's obviously crazy.

But to many of us, these insights simply seem honest. To be fully alive today is to live with anguish, not for one's own condition in the world but for the condition of the world, for a world that is in collapse. What to do when such honesty is unwelcome?

In June 2010, I published a short essay online asking people who felt this anguish to report on their emotions and others' reactions. In less than a month I received more than 300 messages, and while no single comment could sum up the responses, this comes close:

"I feel hopeless. I feel sad. I feel amused at the absurdity of it all. I feel depressed. I feel enraged. I feel guilty and I feel trapped. Basically the only reason why I'm still alive is because there are enough amazing people and things in my life to keep me going, to keep me fighting for what matters. I'm not even sure how to fight yet, but I know that I want to."

I didn't ask for biographical information, so there's little data on the age, race, or occupation of the respondents. Nor did I ask specifically about political or community activism, but the letters reinforced a gut feeling that dealing openly with these emotions need not lead to paralysis and inaction. People can confront honestly a frightening question-"What if the unsustainable systems in which we live are beyond the point of no return?"-and stay politically and socially engaged.

One respondent, a longtime community organizer, put it succinctly:

Recently several of our visionary thinkers have moved from the illusion that 'we have 10 years to turn this around.' They now say clearly that 'we cannot stop this momentum.' It takes courage and faith to speak so plainly. What can we do in the face of this truth? We can sit face to face and find the ways, often beyond words, to explore the reality that we are all refugees, swimming into a future that looks so different from the present. We can find pockets of community where we can whisper our deepest fears about the world. We can remain committed to describing the present with exceptional truth.

What happens when we tell "exceptional truth"?

First, we often feel drained by it. Another respondent observed:

"My personal ambition seems to decrease in proportion to the increase in world suffering. I think that's part of my emotional reaction to crisis. I don't think I am fully alive. I'm not depressed, just weirdly diminished."

Second, we encounter those who don't want to face tough truths. Many wrote about isolation from family and friends who deny there are reasons to be concerned:

"I'm a drug addict with over 20 years clean, and I know all about using up my future and farting out lame excuses. I promised myself an honest life to stay clean, and the double-edged sword is that I started seeing just how much our culture swims in denial."

Sometimes people accuse those who press questions about systemic failure and collapse of being the problem:

"People get angry at me for it and call me 'dark' and 'negative' and 'sinful,' telling me to instead move to the 'light,' 'positive,' and 'love.' Whatever."

Regardless of others' reactions to talking honestly about collapse, it's essential we continue; no political project based on denying reality can be viable for the long term. We need not have a crystal ball to recognize, as singer/songwriter John Gorka put it, that "the old future's gone." The future of endless bounty for all isn't the future we face.

How can we open an honest conversation about that future? It isn't easy, but it starts with telling the truth, from our own experience, like this 70-year-old woman who lives in a rural intentional community:

I've lived long enough now to be very aware of how different the world has become, how the cycles of nature are off kilter, how the seasons and the climate have shifted. My garden tells me that food doesn't grow in quite the same patterns, and we either get weeks of rain or weeks of heat and drought. This is the second year in a row that our apple trees do not have apples on them. But most people get their food in grocery stores where the apples still appear, and food still arrives, in season and out, from all over the world. This will soon end, and people won't understand why. They don't see the trouble in the land as I and my friends do. I grieve daily as I look on this altered world. My grandchildren are young adults who think their lives will continue as they have been. Who will tell them? They can't hear me. They, and many others, will have to see the changes for themselves, as I have. I can't imagine that anything else will convince them. My grief for the world, and for them, is compounded by this feeling of helplessness because there is no way we can have the collective action you speak of when the 'collective' is still in denial.

The work of breaking out of denial is less about specific actions and more about the habits and virtues we must cultivate. Far from that rural community, a 35-year-old woman working in an office in Chicago summed up the task:

"We really need to take it back to the basics and keep it simple. This reminds me of one of my own quotes I thought of a few months ago-'be humble or be humiliated.' I think I'm a simple person. I try to avoid making things more complex than they have to be. I try to focus more on what I need versus what I want. 'Be humble or be humiliated' is my own personal reminder."

Her personal reminder is relevant for us all, individually and collectively. Humanity's last hope may be in embracing a deep humility, recognizing that our cleverness is outstripped by our ignorance. If we become truly humble, we can abandon attempts to dominate the living world and instead find our place in it.



Jeremiah 10:23: "I well know, O Jehovah, that to earthling man his way does not belong. It does not belong to man who is walking even to direct his step."
aboutleaving
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October 21 2010 6:00 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
so basically by pretending to know that god's real and what he wants you're killing humanity, jdubit.

don't even think of denying it, i read it in YES! magazine.
jdubit
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October 21 2010 6:00 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: InTheButtLikeWhat

jdub- what, exactly, are YOU doing about it?



pointing people to the only solution to this problem, Jehovah God's Kingdom.
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