2 horses die on "Flicka" set.. 13 replies, 14826 views

Bitch_Tits
4/30/2005 10:49:00 PM
Fri Apr 29, 5:56 PM ET


Flicka is running out of friends.

According to the American Humane Society, two horses have died in just two weeks on the set of the upcoming My Friend Flicka remake, starring Tim McGraw.

A rodeo horse died Monday while shooting a "wild horse race scene" at the Hansen Dam Equestrian Center in Los Angeles' San Fernando Valley, prompting production to briefly shut down. The equine actor broke free from its handlers and tripped over a rope, breaking its neck. And a quarter horse was put down on Apr. 11 after it tripped during filming and broke its back leg.

American Humane Association spokeswoman Sara Spaulding said her organization is conducting an investigation of 20th Century Fox to see if the Flicka filmmakers are following animal-friendly guidelines. The movie is being produced the studio's Fox 2000 division.

The movie brain trust, meanwhile, has issued a statement, saying "we are terribly saddened by the events that occurred. The production has taken every possible precaution and safety measure in shooting scenes where horses are involved."

The City of Los Angeles' Department of Animal Services allowed filming to resume on Tuesday, and the AHA investigation continues. But the production will no longer be able to use wild mustangs previously employed on the shoot, according a spokesman for the department.


But many animal-rights activists say the AHA probe may be compromised because the group is paid by the Screen Actors Guild to monitor animal use in films.

"I am mortified. Poor horses. They've gotta stop this," Kathy Riordan, a member of the Los Angeles Animal Services Commission told UPI. "I personally think there is a major conflict of interest when the entity responsible for monitoring an industry is supported by it. Any way you look at it, [the AHA] gets paid by Hollywood and there's something wrong with that."

My Friend Flicka is a remake of the 1943 Roddy McDowall film. The new version, starring McGraw, Maria Bello and Alison Lohman, is scheduled to hit theaters in February.

click here for link
Didymos
5/4/2005 12:08:00 AM
Pity response.

I felt bad no one responded to this thread.

Horses are cool. Using animals for the sake of human entertainment is completely without justification.

One notable exception to this is the American classic Dunston Checks In.
opeth_pa
5/4/2005 6:46:00 AM
If the investigations show that these deaths were truly an accident then it should be a non-issue.
ivy000
5/4/2005 6:01:00 PM
Didymos
5/4/2005 6:08:00 PM
Originally posted by:opeth_pa

If the investigations show that these deaths were truly an accident then it should be a non-issue.

Animals shouldn't be used for entertainment purposes anyway. They're not props.
opeth_pa
5/5/2005 9:35:00 AM
I don't think an animal that is treated well is being used as a prop. If people rode a horse into a fight in the past and you are trying to tell the story of that fight that would alternative would you use?
Didymos
5/5/2005 2:43:00 PM
Originally posted by:opeth_pa

I don't think an animal that is treated well is being used as a prop. If people rode a horse into a fight in the past and you are trying to tell the story of that fight that would alternative would you use?

There is no need for movies that involve animals. The potential is there for exploitation, whether it actually takes place or not. I'm willing to lend a certain amount of credence to people who argue that some human beings need to eat animals in order to survive in certain areas of the world. I actually have a great deal of respect for traditional hunter-gatherer societies. But to argue for using animals in movies or television shows? How are movies a human need? They're not. End of argument.
opeth_pa
5/5/2005 2:54:00 PM
So what you are saying is their should be no historical movies made where horses are a factor. No fantasy based movies where horses are a factor.
Didymos
5/5/2005 2:56:00 PM
Originally posted by:opeth_pa

So what you are saying is their should be no historical movies made where horses are a factor. No fantasy based movies where horses are a factor.

In my ideal world...yes. I just don't see the point. It's unnecessary, and as I said before, human beings have a tendency to treat animals like crap, so there always exists the possibility of exploitation in situations like this. For something so trivial and unnecessary, the risk of exploitation is not worth it. We're talking about movies, for crying out loud.
Billy Crystals
5/5/2005 3:07:00 PM
Originally posted by:Lament Configuration

Pity response.

I felt bad no one responded to this thread.

Horses are cool. Using animals for the sake of human entertainment is completely without justification.

One notable exception to this is the American classic Dunston Checks In.


Dunston Checks In, ahahahahahahahahaha.

But yeah, if you aren't going to use the animals in a safe manner, don't use them at all.
Didymos
5/6/2005 5:40:00 PM
Originally posted by:JohnnyV

as long as people think that escapism by way of spending time watching other people bumble around on screen and get paid millions for it, people are going to put animals in films. putting a horse in a movie isn't nearly as stupid as paying tom cruise two million to sit on it for five minutes

Of course it's going to continue to take place. I was just saying I would prefer it not.
CARCILLOs MOLESTACHE
5/6/2005 6:00:00 PM
The film industry hoodwinks filmgoers and television viewers with the American Humane Association's (AHA) misleading "No animals were harmed" seal of approval. The AHA does not monitor the training of animals or their living and transport conditions. Its guidelines are vague, and it rarely, if ever, files formal complaints against studios or production houses. In fact, the AHA actively defends the use of animals in productions despite its inherent cruelty.

On April 25, 2005, a horse died during the filming of a movie called Flicka. According to eyewitnesses, handlers had been seen intentionally agitating and punching the animals. One of the horses, apparently frightened and nervous, became entangled in a heavy, 30-foot rope wrapped around her neck and fell and broke her neck. Production set employees who saw the incident report that the ropes had posed a clear danger. Further, they report that no one from the AHA took action to stop the scene, even though California penal code prohibits tethering animals in such a manner that the animal may become entangled or injured.

Only when this horrific tragedy was made public did the AHA publicly confirm that another horse had been euthanized two weeks earlier after breaking his leg in a similar incident.

Despite their size, horses are very fragile and are easily frightened. While horses are among the most commonly used animals in film production, they receive the least protection, as they are excluded from federal regulation under the Animal Welfare Act.

AHA's reported inaction in response to the risky horse stunts isn't surprising. Recently, PETA has asked the AHA to incorporate some very simple guidelines to help reduce the abuse of great apes by the film industry. These include requiring that animal suppliers comply with the federal Animal Welfare Act, ensuring that infants are not traumatized by pulling them from their mothers, and clarifying in its disclaimer that the AHA does not monitor pre-production training, during which beatings often occur. The AHA has refused to respond to our simple and repeated requests.

The AHA's film-monitoring unit is funded by the Screen Actors Guild. In other words, it is paid by the very industry that it is monitoring. That's a clear conflict of interest. The protection of animals is going to take a back seat to the needs of Hollywood producers and directors. The entertainment industry shouldn't be policing itself when it comes to the use of animals on movie sets.

PETA is calling on the AHA to rate Flicka "Monitored Unacceptable," to cooperate with authorities investigating the horse deaths, and to make an announcement to the public immediately if any animals die on the set in the future.

Please ask the AHA to take a clear stand against cruelty to animals on sets. Urge it to prohibit scenes that pose a clear danger to animals, to immediately disclose to the public information about animal deaths on movie sets, and to implement PETA's simple recommendations concerning the use of great apes in films:
Marie Belew Wheatley
President and CEO
American Humane Association
63 Inverness Dr. E.
Englewood, CO 80112
303-792-9900
303-792-5333 (fax)
online contact: http://www.americanhumane.org/site/PageServer?pagename=wh_contact_us_survey
Didymos
5/6/2005 11:54:00 PM
Originally posted by:JohnnyV

i'm just saying that the stupidity and exploitation of putting a horse in a movie pales next to the stupidity and exploitation of actually making movies. how many idiots do you know that would have no lives if there weren't movies to watch? worse, how many idiots does the entire gossip industry cater to? the hollywood actors who run around being morally bankrupt assholes, should be shot, the morons who are bred to follow their every move and are actually interested in who J Lo is dating or what ashton kutcher is driving are the ones who are really being exploited, if anything.

It's not movies that are the problem. Movies are fine as long as people don't fixate on them. The problem is the utter superficiality and emptiness of our society that cause people to obsess over celebrities and other nonsense.

You ever watch shows like Access Hollywood? Shows like that make me want to vomit.

But back to my point, there is no need to have animals in movies. It's such a trite issue.
Didymos
5/8/2005 11:51:00 PM
I don't care how hot anyone thinks Paris Hilton is. She needs to die, and FAST.