Hairdressers 20 replies, 22904 views

viva hate
1/8/2011 11:34:00 AM
I know this may be a long shot, and I'm expecting only Kendra will respond, but whatever. Basically, I'm getting laid off in a few weeks. I decided that instead of continuing down a career path that I am successful at, yet really despise, I'm going to try out something I've always been interested in. I want to go to cosmetology school......lawlz.

I've always wanted to do hair, and the most rewarding/fun job I've ever had was working at salons.

If you went to school for this, or know someone who has and you have advice on where to go, etc. It would be much appreciated. I'm considering jean madeline, but any imput would be nice.



Also, bonus, you are all invited to my white trash graduation party...which will include a keg of coors light, hot dogs and free mullet haircuts for all.
mandakatzz(deleted)
1/8/2011 11:46:00 AM
I dont know about PA, but in MD with have robert paul and paul mitchell school, plus tons of others. It's a great job, but you must have goals beyond doing hair, such as your own line, owning your own salon and so on. The money is decent depending on what kind of salon you work at. You make more knowing how to do multiple things, eyebrows, manicures, treatments, color specialist and so on. My one friend donna clear 500$ a week in her pocket she works in a semi upscale salon in bmore trendy area. My hairdresser Laura is 38 she started off in the upscale trendy salons and now works at hair cuttery in the boonies. I love it cause I get an upscale taught hairdresser for hair cuttery prices. They have free health insurance at hair cuttery too.

If you can do hair/makeup and become a color specialist you can make bank. My friend jenn makes a grand a week, she's busy as hell and appointments are a month out. She makes the most doing photoshoots and freelancing.
amber ?
1/8/2011 11:48:00 AM
do this and I will let you experiment on my hair.
tom.
1/8/2011 12:19:00 PM
Originally posted by: amber ?

do this and I will let you experiment on my hair.

Shaina.B
1/8/2011 12:21:00 PM
I have been a licensed cosmetologist for 8 years. Be sure to research schools in your area, and ask to not only take a tour, but also sit in on a theory, and practical class. see how they operate, see if the students look like they want to kill themselves. etc. I taught in a Paul Mitchell school and was an educator for them for a while. they definitely are very education driven, and open doors for advanced training as well as helping you with job placement when you graduate. I would highly suggest working in a salon while you're in school as well. if you can, shampoo, assist, and reception while you're in school, you will have the advantage of learning real deal usable color formulation, and practical technique, in addition to the basic knowledge you acquire in school. another option is to apprentice in a salon. the hourly requirement for licensure is higher, but its a much cheaper way to go.

as far as amanda's opinion on needing to set goals of starting your own line, open your own salon etc. thats bullshit. most people that open their own salon within the first 10 years in the industry fail miserably. and with thousands, literally thousands of product/color lines on the market, starting your own offers literally no profit unless you're doing something completely innovative and unheard of. so unless you're a chemist, I would not suggest heading down that road. there is great experience, and money in higher education. for example platform work, or getting in with a bigger company and working your way to creative director.

all in all, it is a great career if you have any passion for it. but you have to work really really hard.
viva hate
1/8/2011 12:27:00 PM
Thanks mandajamz, I have a ton of connections from working in salons, so I already have an in. And, I'm going back to work in one after I'm laid off. I understand it's pretty much an industry where you make your own paycheck, and its all about having tons of determination. I know further and continuing education is crucial, too.

Amber, no problem, as long as you come to my white trash graduation. You don't have to get a mullet unless you want one.
Peter SteeleyDan
1/8/2011 12:29:00 PM
viva hate
1/8/2011 12:37:00 PM
Shaina, thanks! I was looking into a paul mitchell school (there are 2 relatively close to me), but I didn't know anyone who went to one. I've known a few people who went to jean madeline and I absolutely loved their techniques. Ill definitely have to go sit in on classes. Good idea.
Shaina.B
1/8/2011 12:44:00 PM
Yeah I went through school out west. and went to paul mitchell advanced academy. teaching in the school was a great experience. there are very very paul mitchell- the school academies. but there are TONS of partner schools. with the partner schools, be sure to ask how long they have been partnered with JPMS and ask how often they do hair shows, and have the JPMS educators and platform artists doing in house education. if you're going through the school, you want to make sure that you're not only getting the great education, but you get the experience you're paying for. good luck!
viva hate
1/8/2011 3:25:00 PM
Didn't you go to school? Tell me about that.

WillyWonka.jpg
megharp
1/8/2011 6:31:00 PM
Originally posted by: Shaina.B

I have been a licensed cosmetologist for 8 years. Be sure to research schools in your area, and ask to not only take a tour, but also sit in on a theory, and practical class. see how they operate, see if the students look like they want to kill themselves. etc. I taught in a Paul Mitchell school and was an educator for them for a while. they definitely are very education driven, and open doors for advanced training as well as helping you with job placement when you graduate. I would highly suggest working in a salon while you're in school as well. if you can, shampoo, assist, and reception while you're in school, you will have the advantage of learning real deal usable color formulation, and practical technique, in addition to the basic knowledge you acquire in school. another option is to apprentice in a salon. the hourly requirement for licensure is higher, but its a much cheaper way to go.

as far as amanda's opinion on needing to set goals of starting your own line, open your own salon etc. thats bullshit. most people that open their own salon within the first 10 years in the industry fail miserably. and with thousands, literally thousands of product/color lines on the market, starting your own offers literally no profit unless you're doing something completely innovative and unheard of. so unless you're a chemist, I would not suggest heading down that road. there is great experience, and money in higher education. for example platform work, or getting in with a bigger company and working your way to creative director.

all in all, it is a great career if you have any passion for it. but you have to work really really hard.

Shaina really hit the nail on the head, I went to an Aveda school and got a ton of experience and was really lucky that i had the fund to take advantage of that. However unless you have the heart and you love doing it a lot of people get very discouraged and I know a lot of people who i went to school with who lost all motivation in school and all desire to do hair. Definitely do your research and find a school to feel comfortable with and feel like they will teach you a lot, One of my favorite things about doing hair is its so everchanging and so many new things come into play that you will never be bored. Also your best bet after school is finding a salon that gives you a steady pay, unless you build up a lot of clients however most clients you will meet in school aren't going to follow you because they go to the school for the cheaper school prices. With all that said good luck, Its a pretty competitive career but its definitely fun and I wouldn't want to be doing anything else
viva hate
1/8/2011 7:18:00 PM
Originally posted by: megharp

Originally posted by: Shaina.B

I have been a licensed cosmetologist for 8 years. Be sure to research schools in your area, and ask to not only take a tour, but also sit in on a theory, and practical class. see how they operate, see if the students look like they want to kill themselves. etc. I taught in a Paul Mitchell school and was an educator for them for a while. they definitely are very education driven, and open doors for advanced training as well as helping you with job placement when you graduate. I would highly suggest working in a salon while you're in school as well. if you can, shampoo, assist, and reception while you're in school, you will have the advantage of learning real deal usable color formulation, and practical technique, in addition to the basic knowledge you acquire in school. another option is to apprentice in a salon. the hourly requirement for licensure is higher, but its a much cheaper way to go.

as far as amanda's opinion on needing to set goals of starting your own line, open your own salon etc. thats bullshit. most people that open their own salon within the first 10 years in the industry fail miserably. and with thousands, literally thousands of product/color lines on the market, starting your own offers literally no profit unless you're doing something completely innovative and unheard of. so unless you're a chemist, I would not suggest heading down that road. there is great experience, and money in higher education. for example platform work, or getting in with a bigger company and working your way to creative director.

all in all, it is a great career if you have any passion for it. but you have to work really really hard.

Shaina really hit the nail on the head, I went to an Aveda school and got a ton of experience and was really lucky that i had the fund to take advantage of that. However unless you have the heart and you love doing it a lot of people get very discouraged and I know a lot of people who i went to school with who lost all motivation in school and all desire to do hair. Definitely do your research and find a school to feel comfortable with and feel like they will teach you a lot, One of my favorite things about doing hair is its so everchanging and so many new things come into play that you will never be bored. Also your best bet after school is finding a salon that gives you a steady pay, unless you build up a lot of clients however most clients you will meet in school aren't going to follow you because they go to the school for the cheaper school prices. With all that said good luck, Its a pretty competitive career but its definitely fun and I wouldn't want to be doing anything else


thanks! I was looking into going to an aveda school. I'll have to check it out, though. I requested info from them. I just need to figure out how to pay for it......haha.
megharp
1/8/2011 8:02:00 PM
Originally posted by: viva hate

Originally posted by: megharp

Originally posted by: Shaina.B

I have been a licensed cosmetologist for 8 years. Be sure to research schools in your area, and ask to not only take a tour, but also sit in on a theory, and practical class. see how they operate, see if the students look like they want to kill themselves. etc. I taught in a Paul Mitchell school and was an educator for them for a while. they definitely are very education driven, and open doors for advanced training as well as helping you with job placement when you graduate. I would highly suggest working in a salon while you're in school as well. if you can, shampoo, assist, and reception while you're in school, you will have the advantage of learning real deal usable color formulation, and practical technique, in addition to the basic knowledge you acquire in school. another option is to apprentice in a salon. the hourly requirement for licensure is higher, but its a much cheaper way to go.

as far as amanda's opinion on needing to set goals of starting your own line, open your own salon etc. thats bullshit. most people that open their own salon within the first 10 years in the industry fail miserably. and with thousands, literally thousands of product/color lines on the market, starting your own offers literally no profit unless you're doing something completely innovative and unheard of. so unless you're a chemist, I would not suggest heading down that road. there is great experience, and money in higher education. for example platform work, or getting in with a bigger company and working your way to creative director.

all in all, it is a great career if you have any passion for it. but you have to work really really hard.

Shaina really hit the nail on the head, I went to an Aveda school and got a ton of experience and was really lucky that i had the fund to take advantage of that. However unless you have the heart and you love doing it a lot of people get very discouraged and I know a lot of people who i went to school with who lost all motivation in school and all desire to do hair. Definitely do your research and find a school to feel comfortable with and feel like they will teach you a lot, One of my favorite things about doing hair is its so everchanging and so many new things come into play that you will never be bored. Also your best bet after school is finding a salon that gives you a steady pay, unless you build up a lot of clients however most clients you will meet in school aren't going to follow you because they go to the school for the cheaper school prices. With all that said good luck, Its a pretty competitive career but its definitely fun and I wouldn't want to be doing anything else


thanks! I was looking into going to an aveda school. I'll have to check it out, though. I requested info from them. I just need to figure out how to pay for it......haha.

the price went up since when i went to school, but it was still insane, they have a financial plan but in the end you really end up paying about 3x the cost. a lot of people i went to school with took out loans, they had a scholarship contest when i was applying. you should ask about it when you go interview there/check it out!
viva hate
1/9/2011 8:09:00 AM
Update: I contacted the person whose salon I'll be working at and told him I was considering beauty school (I used to work with him at another salon years ago). He said DON'T GO...because the another stylist at the shop has her teaching license and would definitely be willing to let me apprentice/teach me. I've known both her and the owner for years, worked with them and loved both of their cut/color techniques. It's pretty exciting. I'd love to get a 1 on 1 teaching experience from people I know and respect in the field.


Amber and Tom: I'll be at 21st and fairmount come on down hahah
Davey.
1/9/2011 8:20:00 AM
that rules.

i would happily let you butcher my hair. i cut my own constantly.
viva hate
1/9/2011 8:39:00 AM
Could we play hairdresser on fire on loop the entire time? Come to the states in a few months and get your cut on. Uhhhh
Davey.
1/9/2011 8:59:00 AM
i cant. i'm just so busy. busy busy. busy scissors, oh ohhhh.
viva hate
1/9/2011 9:05:00 AM
lawl
Amanda OMGWTF
1/10/2011 12:47:00 AM
i think you should go. i went, i loved it, had a blast and learned a ton. made a ton of friends at school, too. worked in a salon for a couple years after. wouldn't trade the experience. after getting the education, a solid foundation and practical experience, it's a skill i can - and do - use even though i'm not working in the field professionally.

other than that, i know zilch about the licensing laws or schools in PA, so not much to offer.
mary
1/12/2011 11:20:00 PM
I cannot wait until you are ready for me to sit in your chair!
if you want you can practices on my hair any time! its not like you haven't already

but I am very happy that you get to go after your dreamz

good luck!
kendraaa
2/6/2011 11:02:00 PM
I seriously just saw this ahhaha. but I will tell you, I absolutely love my job and my career choice. however, you must be willing to take a pay hit at first. the school is there to prepare you for your state boards. I don't trust a single person who doesn't assist in a salon after finishing school. that is where you will truly learn how to do hair. my only "complaint" is that my salon has been listening to us lately and we are firing people that we don't feel are truly into what they're doing, and as a result I have been taking a lot of people's days/clients. It isn't a real complaint because I got to spent $150 this week on two dresses without an ounce of regret. good luck and PM me about anymore details/questions/school suggestions in philly (I have some hairdresser friends out there).

and now that I read your update, I would highly recommend getting licensed that way. you will be getting paid and learning. good luck!